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Huge day for CU as 1,200 students visit campus for TN Supreme Court Oral Arguments

10/2/2015

,Cumberland University Welcomed the Tennessee State Supreme Court and 1,200 High School students from Middle Tennessee to its Campus

The campus was a buzz this week as Cumberland University played host to the Tennessee Supreme Court and over 1,200 High School students from the mid-state.

The Court was on campus to hear oral arguments for thee cases as part of the Supreme Court Advancing Legal Education for Students program.

High school students from 11 counties took advantage of the opportunity to see the Supreme Court in action. They sat in the courtroom, aka Dallas Floyd Recreation Center, and heard actual cases being argued. For many this was a once in a life time opportunity.

"This was a great honor and learning experience for me and my classmates," said McKale Carter, a senior from White House High School. "Learning how the Supreme Court functions was extremely interesting. I am grateful to Cumberland University for the invitation and getting to learn more about the school".

The students were able to take tours of campus, meet with Cumberland students and faculty and learn about academic and career possibilities during their visit at the University.

Many even inquired about using the Tennessee Promise Scholarship at Cumberland University. Cumberland is a partner of the Tennessee Promise program and offers 5 competitive associate degree programs.  Learn more here.

The cases that were heard at Cumberland were:

The first case, State v. Linzey Danielle Smith, involves a DUI conviction and whether the trooper had probable cause to stop the Defendant for failing to maintain a vehicle entirely within a single lane "as nearly as practicable."

The second case, State v. Corrin Kathleen Reynolds, involves vehicular homicide, vehicular assault, reckless endangerment and DUI charges. This is an interlocutory appeal so there has been no conviction at the trial court level.

The third case, Pervis Tyrone Payne v. State, involves the appeal of a death sentence based on the intellectual capacity of the Defendant.

Cumberland University was very grateful to have hosted the Justices and Staff of the Tennessee Supreme Court.

 

High School students gathering on the
CU front lawn during visit to campus
Court session being held in the
Dallas Floyd Recreation Center
President Stumb welcoming guests

 

RELATED:

Tennessee Promise @ CU

Pre-Law at CU

The Tennessee Supreme Court

The Justices

SCALES

Court Opinions

 

 

 


UPDATED 9/29/15
Preparations are well underway for the Tennessee Supreme Court oral arguments sessions that will take place on the campus Sept. 30. The event is part of the court’s Supreme Court Advancing Legal Education for Students (SCALES) initiative, a program designed to educate students across Tennessee about the judicial branch of government.

CU will host the sessions in the Dallas Floyd Recreation Center beginning promptly at 9 am. The hearings will be open to the general public with over 1,200 high school students are expected to attend. The students will have opportunities during the day to visit and discuss the cases with the attorneys who presented arguments.

What you need to know!

This will be a courtroom setting, therefore certain protocol must be observed. Your cooperation is appreciated.

 

  • Everyone will be required to clear a metal detector prior to entering the courtroom.

  • Dress appropriately

  • Remove hats before entering courtroom

  • Enter courtroom prior to commencement of argument

  • Stand when justices enter and leave courtroom

  • Members of the Supreme Court are to be addressed as "Justice" or "Chief Justice".

  • Weapons of any kind are prohibited

  • Do not bring book bags, backpacks or cell phones

  • Do not create any type of distractions in the courtroom

The cases:

The first case, State v. Linzey Danielle Smith, involves a DUI conviction and whether the trooper had probable cause to stop the Defendant for failing to maintain a vehicle entirely within a single lane "as nearly as practicable."

The second case, State v. Corrin Kathleen Reynolds, involves vehicular homicide, vehicular assault, reckless endangerment and DUI charges. This is an interlocutory appeal so there has been no conviction at the trial court level.

The third case, Pervis Tyrone Payne v. State, involves the appeal of a death sentence based on the intellectual capacity of the Defendant.

If you are planning to attend:

Parking will be very scarce on this day. School buses will primarily being using McClain Avenue on the south side of campus to pick up and drop off students. Visitors may park in any campus lot or at St. Frances Cabrini Catholic Church on South Tarver Avenue.

Session schedule:

Session I will begin promptly at 9:00 am. Session II will start at 10:15 am. Session III will begin at 1:15 pm. All sessions will take place in the Dallas Floyd Recreation Center.

Security:

All persons will be subject to search prior to entering the courtroom (Dallas Floyd Recreation Center). Admission into the courtroom is not guaranteed - seating is limited. Cell phones, cameras, weapons and backpacks are not permitted inside the courtroom.

Cumberland's connection to the Court:

As one of the earliest Universities to house a law school Cumberland has a rich history that connects it to our nation's judicial process. In all, 15 Cumberland Alumni have served as Chief Justice or Associate Justice for the United States Supreme Court and the Tennessee State Supreme Court.

United States Supreme Court - Horace H. Lurton, Howell E. Jackson.

Tennessee State Supreme Court - Waller C. Caldwell, Robert L. Caruthers, Chester C. Chattin, Ross W. Dyer, Sam L. Felts, Grafton Green, Nathan Green, Frank P. Hall, Joe W. Henry, Allison B. Humphreys, Horace H. Lurton, A. B. Neil, Charles H. O'Brien, Weldon B. White.

*Media outlets are required to submit requests to the Supreme Court in order to have cameras in the courtroom and receive permission from the court to attend. Please contact 615-741-2687 or michele.wojciechowski@tncourts.gov. 

 


Original Release 9/8/15

The Tennessee Supreme Court will hear oral arguments on the campus of Cumberland University Sept. 30. The event is part of the court’s Supreme Court Advancing Legal Education for Students (SCALES) initiative, a program designed to educate students across Tennessee about the judicial branch of government.

TN Supreme Court will hear oral arguments
at Cumberland University on September 30

CU will host the sessions in the Dallas Floyd Recreation Center beginning promptly at 9 am. The hearings will be open to the general public and over 1,000 high school students are expected to attend. The students will have opportunities during the day to visit and discuss the cases with the attorneys who presented arguments.

“For many people this is a very unique opportunity to hear a case before the Tennessee State Supreme Court.” said Dr. C. William McKee, Vice President of Academic Affairs. “Those in attendance will see first hand how the judicial process works and be able to speak with many of those directly involved with the cases.”

The justices will hear three cases:

The first case, State v. Linzey Danielle Smith, involves a DUI conviction and whether the trooper had probable cause to stop the Defendant for failing to maintain a vehicle entirely within a single lane "as nearly as practicable."

The second case, State v. Corrin Kathleen Reynolds, involves vehicular homicide, vehicular assault, reckless endangerment and DUI charges. This is an interlocutory appeal so there has been no conviction at the trial court level.

The third case, Pervis Tyrone Payne v. State, involves the appeal of a death sentence based on the intellectual capacity of the Defendant.

The SCALES program was designed to offer students the unique opportunity to hear oral arguments for actual cases. Since its inception in 1995, the SCALES project has given more than 25,000 Tennessee students from more than 460 high schools the ability to hear oral arguments for actual cases and watch the judicial branch operate.

For more than 170 years, Cumberland has offered students an outstanding liberal arts education geared toward real-life success. Cumberland is a contemporary liberal arts university focused on creating leaders that are ready to advance any field of their choosing. The Faculty foster a culture of entrepreneurial thinking, and are dedicated to helping students discover possibilities that extend beyond the imagination. We help you Learn What’s Possible.

 

RELATED:

Pre-Law at CU

The Tennessee Supreme Court

The Justices

SCALES

Court Opinions